Stanford knows Public Speaking

Careers

This post is a reproduction from Stanford Business. It’s concise and to the point. I’m a fan and without further ado, here it is:

5 Tips to Become a Comfortable & Confident Public Speaker

Eighty-five percent of people struggle with speaking in front of others, and the other 15 percent are probably lying, shared Lecturer Matt Abrahams in a recent Mastery in Communication Initiative workshop at Stanford GSB. From introducing someone, to making a cold call, to being put on the spot to answer a question in a meeting, spontaneous speaking situations can make peoples’ hearts race and hands shake. Some anxiety is good when talking in public – it gives you energy and helps you focus – but you want to learn how to manage it so it doesn’t manage you, believes Abrahams. Here are five tips for becoming more confident and comfortable in any speaking situation:

1. Manage your anxiety.
When you start feeling your heart pound and hands sweat, acknowledge the nerves. Saying, “This is me being nervous,” won’t take the anxiety away, but it’ll prevent it from increasing. Also try reframing the public speaking situation as a conversation rather than a performance.

2. Get out of your own way.
We tend to set very lofty standards for ourselves when speaking in front of others; we try to say really inspiring, poetic things all the time. But you should “dare to be dull,” advises Abrahams. You don’t always have to go for a laugh or the stars. Set your speaking goals at a reasonable level so you can overachieve.

3. Focus on the audience.
Too often people are afraid of speaking spontaneously because they think the spotlight is all on them, noted Abrahams. But your job as the speaker is to help your audience achieve some goal. It’s not all about you. Understanding that the attention is partly on your listeners can help you feel less nervous.

4. Prioritize.
Really think about your audience so you can tailor what you are saying to them. Consider their needs so you can prioritize what you share and take away the anxiety of missing something. “Do what’s needed, nothing more, nothing less,” says Abrahams.

5. Respond concisely.
To avoid rambling on when answering a question, follow a simple response “structure.” One example of a three-step roadmap to give your answer some direction: 1) Answer the question; 2) Detail an example; 3) Describe the benefits.

Great simple tips right? I hope you found it helpful too.

MMA

The Choice is YOURS

Careers, What's Up?

I’ve just published a new post in the MMA In Practice blog regarding Employment Types: working as a permanent employee or a contractor.

With that, I will start publishing stuff like that and interviews into that site. I’ll have a period of coexistence; having same content on both sites, until I decide on how to best organise and manage both.

Looks like a sunny 23 Spring day over here today and I’m certainly feeling the pollen in the air already (itchy eyes, runny nose). But despite that little inconvenience, I’m still looking forward to a bright Monday!

Hope you guys enjoy your day / evenings today.

PC @ MMA

 

Are you ‘culturally fit’ for the job?

Careers

I really like this article. It starts off by explaining what cultural fit means:

A fit is where there is congruence between the norms and values of the organization and those of the person

Then how the 2 personalities – introvert and extrovert – would fit within an organisation that has an open plan or separate cubicles setup:

If the introvert ends up in an organization which only uses open-plan offices — or, even worse, expects all employees to attend riotous parties every weekend — this would be an example of poor fit, or strain. An extravert in the same environment would have a much higher level of positive cultural fit.If the introvert ends up in an organization which only uses open-plan offices — or, even worse, expects all employees to attend riotous parties every weekend — this would be an example of poor fit, or strain. An extravert in the same environment would have a much higher level of positive cultural fit.

This is quite intuitive of course and cultural fit has a strong correlation with good productivity (or positive outcomes as the article suggests). We all knew that. It’s just that its been a while since an article has come down and explained it well.

MMA